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the atmosphere that we are facing and the environment that we are going to face in january? >> first thing i would remind them is to expect the up expected. a couple of years ago, we were all stunned when president obama signed into law the tax relief act that extended bush tax cuts and increased transfer tax exemptions to historic levels. we are now looking at something very different and we need to prepare for taxes rising, but also, take advantage of certain opportunities today. as you say, we have got about six weeks left to get it done. >> let talk about some of those advantages, because it's such a scary story really. >> yes. >> if you've had a decent year in the market and you have some gapes, a lot of people are talking about apple, for instance, there's some thought that maybe if you have a pretty decent gape in apple, do you take those profits this year? do you accelerate your income at this point? >> well, think about what's happening to capital gapes tax rates. we are at 15% today, slated to go up to 20% in january, plus you have the specter of the new medicare tax, which now we
process and with this going on, we will have very difficult environment for investment and growth for the euro area to go ahead. so without clarity where the euro area goes, the environment will be quite difficult. p. >> okay. thanks very much for that. now, he mentioned weakness in europe. that's extending to the u.s. we are seeing futures trying to rebond here, but again, we saw levels of decline in the range of 1.3 to 1.5 yesterday for the major bourses. this morning we're really only getting about 25 points in rebound for the dow jones industrial average. which is thousand sitting at 12,559. the nasdaq and s&p are also showing a little about the of a r rebit of a rebound, but not huge moves. investors digest the growth tigs or lack thereof. spain is trying to move to the up side adding almost 0.3%, so a little better than last time we checked in. the other three down. as we're learning about the slowing of the german economy and the ftse 100, shedding 0.4%, below the 5700 mark. now, we are seeing in the uk a little better, but broadly speaking a mixed picture. we started off s
, as does my environment just by nature. so the book is very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth and how over time it changes. the same substance -- stone, rock, water, wood -- go from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat. and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality all the way from childhood where we're immortal to our elder years where we become the thing that holds so many people we've lost and is what survives. memory is what survives. and within that memory the afterlife of so much. so thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago, i certainly did not expect i would end up here or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think what we've heard so far is that a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never have been an outpost? what's the context within my own war experience? who was i before i went
. that is a real scoop in an environment where there are no deals, david brought us a very good scoop. >> that's why you haven't participated in any of this. there are no other deals. this was the only one. >> not many needles in the hay stack. >> david found the only one. thank you for bringing it here, david. boyd jeffries name. >> what was it exposure in europe? >> egan had all sorts of rhymes and reasons for that company falling apart. >> we'll talk about shipping right now, from i-phones to apparel, cnbc's senior talent producer, lori ann larocco, our staff, incredible producer and her book "dynasties of the sea," and lori ann, reading through this, we know how important shipping is, we talk about it every day but there were things i didn't realize how much of the things in our homes are brought to us from ships. >> 92% of everything in a household has been on a ship and ever since superstorm sandy we've all realized how important shipping is as we're all going through this gasoline crisis. it's really amazing in terms of the wide breadth that the shipping industry has on the economy. >>
the environment is bad for the environment, beavers form wetlands other species could move into. he's important. >> what else does he eat besides bananas? >> vegetation and he likes to eat tree bark. he has teeth on them that are so much enamel that are bright orange. these guys chop down trees and build dams with them. >> you don't want to get in front of an angry beaver. >> bring out the owl. >> let me put the baby alligator away. the last animal is another species that would have been -- >> what are they called? >> barn owl. these are a species native to europe. european colonists would have been used to seeing these guys. these animals can find prey in pitch darkness. >> you're kidding. >> tests have been done on these species, they've removed every iota of light. they are called barn owls, because they are one of the few species that can live in human structures and benefit from our building. >> is that okay on your hand, looks like he's breaking skin. >> this is the first time you haven't been pooped on or bleeding. the turkey did enough for everybody. thank you so much, dave. >> thank yo
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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